The notion of ethics and personal philosophy of an individual

Similarly, ethical value may be regarded as a subgroup of a broader field of philosophic value sometimes referred to as axiology. Similar concepts[ edit ] Ethical value is sometimes used synonymously with goodness. However, goodness has many other meanings and may be regarded as more ambiguous. Personal versus cultural perspectives[ edit ] Personal values exist in relation to cultural values, either in agreement with or divergence from prevailing norms.

The notion of ethics and personal philosophy of an individual

Similarly, ethical value may be regarded as a subgroup of a broader field of philosophic value sometimes referred to as axiology. Ethical value denotes something's degree of importancewith the aim of determining what action or life is best to do, or at least attempt to describe the value of different actions.

Similar concepts[ edit ] Ethical value is sometimes used synonymously with goodness. However, goodness has many other meanings and may be regarded as more ambiguous.

Personal versus cultural perspectives[ edit ] Personal values exist in relation to cultural values, either in agreement with or divergence from prevailing norms. A culture is a social system that shares a set of common values, in which such values permit social expectations and collective understandings of the good, beautiful and constructive.

Without normative personal values, there would be no cultural reference against which to measure the virtue of individual values and so cultural identity would disintegrate. Personal values[ edit ] Personal values provide an internal reference for what is good, beneficial, important, useful, beautiful, desirable and constructive.

Section Three

Values are one of the factors that generate behaviour[ dubious — discuss ] [1] and influence the choices made by an individual. Values may help common human problems for survival by comparative rankings of value, the results of which provide answers to questions of why people do what they do and in what order they choose to do them.

Recent research has thereby stressed the implicit nature of value communication. They are self respect, warm relationships, sense of accomplishment, self-fulfillment, fun and enjoyment, excitement, sense of belonging, being well respected, and security.

From a functional aspect these values are categorized into three and they are interpersonal relationship area, personal factors, and non-personal factors. Though the core values are related, the processing of values can differ based on the cultural identity of an individual.

Individual cultures emphasize values which their members broadly share. Values of a society can often be identified by examining the level of honor and respect received by various groups and ideas.

In the United States of Americafor example, top-level professional athletes receive more respect measured in terms of monetary payment than university professors. Another example is that certain voters taken from surveys [ citation needed ] in the United States would not willingly elect an atheist as president, suggesting that believing in a God is a generally shared value.

Values clarification differs from cognitive moral education: Value clarification consists of "helping people clarify what their lives are for and what is worth working for.

It encourages students to define their own values and to understand others' values. Norms provide rules for behavior in specific situations, while values identify what should be judged as good or evil. While norms are standards, patterns, rules and guides of expected behavior, values are abstract concepts of what is important and worthwhile.

Flying the national flag on a holiday is a norm, but it reflects the value of patriotism. Wearing dark clothing and appearing solemn are normative behaviors to manifest respect at a funeral.

Different cultures represent values differently and to different levels of emphasis.

The Human Good and the Function Argument

Members take part in a culture even if each member's personal values do not entirely agree with some of the normative values sanctioned in that culture. This reflects an individual's ability to synthesize and extract aspects valuable to them from the multiple subcultures they belong to.

If a group member expresses a value that seriously conflicts with the group's norms, the group's authority may carry out various ways of encouraging conformity or stigmatizing the non-conforming behavior of that member.

For example, imprisonment can result from conflict with social norms that the state has established as law. In the third instance, the expertise of member-driven international organizations and civil society depends on the incorporation of flexibility in the rules, to preserve the expression of identity in a globalized world.

Thus audiences in Europe may regard a movie as an artistic creation and grant it benefits from special treatment, while audiences in the United States may see it as mere entertainment, whatever its artistic merits. EU policies based on the notion of "cultural exception" can become juxtaposed with the policy of "cultural specificity" on the liberal Anglo-Saxon side.

Value (ethics) - Wikipedia

Indeed, international law traditionally treats films as property and the content of television programs as a service.

Parents in different cultures have different values. Many such cultures begin teaching babies to use sharp tools, including knives, before their first birthdays.

Luos of Kenya value education and pride which they call "nyadhi". The Inglehart—Welzel cultural map of the world is a two-dimensional cultural map showing the cultural values of the countries of the world along two dimensions:Philosophy: Ethics > Virtue Ethics.

The notion of ethics and personal philosophy of an individual

Virtue Ethics (or Virtue Theory) is an approach to Ethics that emphasizes an individual's character as the key element of ethical thinking, rather than rules about the acts themselves or their consequences (Consequentialism).. There are three main strands of Virtue Ethics.

Emmanuel Levinas (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) References and Further Reading 1. Metaethics The term "meta" means after or beyond, and, consequently, the notion of metaethics involves a removed, or bird's eye view of the entire project of ethics.

Eudaimonism is the classical formulation of Virtue Ethics. Ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.

The field of ethics, along with aesthetics, concern matters of value, and thus comprise the branch of philosophy called axiology.. Ethics seeks to resolve questions of human morality by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong.

Ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct. The field of ethics, along with aesthetics, concern matters of value, and thus comprise the branch of philosophy called axiology..

Ethics seeks to resolve questions of human morality by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong. 1.

Emmanuel Levinas (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Preliminaries. Aristotle wrote two ethical treatises: the Nicomachean Ethics and the Eudemian lausannecongress2018.com does not himself use either of these titles, although in the Politics (a36) he refers back to one of them—probably the Eudemian Ethics—as “ta êthika”—his writings about lausannecongress2018.com words “Eudemian” and “Nicomachean” were added later, perhaps because the former was.

Philosophy: Ethics > Virtue Ethics. Virtue Ethics (or Virtue Theory) is an approach to Ethics that emphasizes an individual's character as the key element of ethical thinking, rather than rules about the acts themselves or their consequences (Consequentialism)..

There are three main strands of Virtue Ethics. Eudaimonism is the classical formulation of Virtue Ethics. Lectures on the History of Philosophy. by G W F Hegel, , trans. E S Haldane, Inaugural Address Prefatory Note Introduction A.

Notion of the History of Philosophy.

Hegel - History of Philosophy